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Vineyards and Wineries

Australian Wine Regions

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Wine tasting at Greenock Creek Winery

Wine tasting at South Australia's Greenock Creek Winery

© Australian Tourist Commission 1999

Australian vineyards and wineries are closer to visit than you think.

If you aren’t, or haven’t been, in Australia and don’t know about Australian wines and Australian wine regions, well, you should.

Australian vineyards and wineries are creating wines that carve a name for themselves in many parts of the world and are served in the best of places.

Take a tour

There's probably no better way to get acquainted than to drive to — or take a tour in — some of the Australian vineyards and wineries.

If you’re visiting Australia, take time to go wine-tasting in the vineyards at one or more of the Australian wine regions.

Hunter Valley

In New South Wales, the most notable of the Australian wine regions would be the Hunter Valley which should be less than a half day’s drive from Sydney unless, of course, you like dawdling along the way to catch other country attractions.

Visit Hunter Valley Wine Country for more information.

Sydney region

Sydney itself is developing its own wine region along the peripheries of the city and the wineries here would be among the closest to the city.

Mudgee

In country New South Wales -- if, for instance, you’re visiting the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo -- you could quite easily take a detour through Mudgee which is one of the established but smaller Australian wine regions in the state.

There are about 20 wineries in the Mudgee area and one of them, Craigmoor, has been producing wines since 1858 and is the second oldest operating winery in Australia.

Barossa Valley

In South Australia, you cannot go wrong by barreling up to the vineyards and wineries of the Barossa Valley northeast of Adelaide.

See Barossa Valley Wine County for more information.

Other South Australia wine regions

But while the Barossa claims to be the foremost wine region in Australia, naturally disputed by the Hunter Valley, there are other wine regions in the state including the Upper Murray, Clare Valley and the Coonawarra area as well as McLaren Vale and other wine growing areas in the Fleurieu Peninsula.

Melbourne to Mornington

Victoria’s main wine producing region is the Rutherglen/Milawa area in the northeast but smaller Victorian wine regions are at Yarra Valley, which is the closest to Melbourne, and those in the Mornington Peninsula and the Geelong area.

A distinctive advantage of Victoria’s wine regions is that all are within easy reach of Melbourne, particularly Yarra Valley with more than 70 wineries which lie just outside Melbourne’s greater city area.

Western Australia

Not to be outdone, Western Australia has its Margaret River wine region, also renowned as a surfing mecca, and the wineries at Albany, Denmark, Frankland River, Mount Barker and Porongurup.

Northern Territory

In the heart of the Australian continent, the Northern Territory has a winery in Alice Springs, the Chateau Hornsby, 15 kilometres out of town.

And Tasmania, too

In the island state of Tasmania, visit the vineyards close to Cygnet south of the state capital, Hobart, through Channel Highway from either Kingston or Huonville.

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